Not eager to learn

Re: "Language lesson for Thailand," (PostBag, Sept 10).

I have seen similar enthusiasm in young school students in Vietnam. While going around the Hoan Kiem Lake in Hanoi, I found many students striking a casual conversation with a foreigner just to talk and improve their English.

On the other hand, many Thai youngsters who spend millions to attend international universities located in Bangkok shun English. It seems they just want to socialise and feel proud of attending a hi-so university. While attending English-language classes they tend to converse in Thai.

Sooner or later, they graduate mastering a few sentences, such as, "same, same but different", "I go with you", "Why you no happy?" "I happy", or "I am so exciting". Many Thai instructors also use the same lingo.

Kuldeep Nagi


Justice by force

Re: "Aim for the statutes," (PostBag, Sept 8).

One does not need Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha's power of Section 44 to exclude the period during which someone is on the run from the statute of limitations. It applies to all crimes committed in the area of public affairs, (Section 24/1 Criminal Procedure Code relating to politicians). That does not apply to the Red Bull case.

This was a quick amendment made by an unelected government in response to outcries about so many corrupt political and official convicts fleeing Thailand in style. Ms Yingluck will be the first case covered under this new law if she is convicted on Sept 27.

At least, that is one nice thing about being undemocratic for a change -- the power to ensure a quick response for real justice!

Songdej Praditsmanont


Stuck in progress

Umesh Pandey in his Sept 10 commentary "Language lesson for Thailand" makes a case for letting retired teachers volunteer in government schools to provide conversational experience to students. But this will never happen as long as the Immigration Bureau prohibits volunteering without a special permit, and the Ministry of Education remains stubborn and myopic.

Whatever else Thailand may be, it is certainly not an innovative or creative country when it comes to education. It cannot even claim to "follow the leader".

Jack Gilead


Bangkok is no Tokyo

Re: "Progress at a price," (PostBag, Sept 11).

Although mathematically correct, train fares in Tokyo are more expensive than in Bangkok. However, "a reader" fails to compare cost relative to the income of residents in these two great cities; the average Tokyo metro commuter probably earns four or five times that of the average Bangkok BTS rider.

To be fair to the train-riding public, train fares must be benchmarked on an ability-to-pay scale.

P


Hard day's work

The problem isn't that the skytrain is too expensive. The problem may be the Thai minimum wage of 300 baht per day. How people survive on this amount for their daily living amazes me. Maybe it's time that businesses handing out this paltry sum look at their margins and consider their employees a little better? The days of cheap labour should be history.

Brian Corrigan


A very smooth ride

After lunch at a place in Fashion Island, my wife and I did the weekly shopping, which was bigger than usual. Got a taxi from the rank outside (pelting with rain) and arrived home 20 minutes later, the rain still unrelenting.

Shortly after the driver left, we found out we had forgotten our purchases in the boot of his vehicle. We phoned the taxi company (green/yellow) but the matter was moot.

Pretty glum afternoon until early evening when the taxi driver re-appeared with everything intact. The gentleman, who had just returned from Suvarnabhumi -- where our stuff was discovered later -- was suitably rewarded for his integrity.

Just mentioning this because I think most taxi drivers are decent folk doing a hard job in difficult conditions and with difficult customers. Rogues are ubiquitous in any country, especially at airports.

Robin


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