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His Majesty the King signs constitution (Updated)

His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun signs Thailand's 20th constitution at the Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall in Bangkok at 3.11pm on Thursday. (Photo captured from live TV broadcast)

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His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun has signed Thailand's 20th constitution, starting the clock ticking for a general election to be held in late 2018 at the latest.

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English learners: If I have kept yesterday's story so you can have an example of a "before and after" story. Notice especially how the tenses change between the first and second story. Notice also that in today's story, the first sentence uses the present perfect "has signed". That is because it describes a past event (the signing of the constitution) that is still relevant to the present (the constitution is now officially in use). The rest of the story, however, uses the past tense.

His Majesty the King signs constitution

Online Reporters

His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun has signed Thailand's 20th constitution, starting the clock ticking for a general election to be held in late 2018 at the latest.

In an ancient ceremony not seen in almost 50 years, His Majesty inked the country's highest law at the Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall in Bangkok at 3.11pm on Thursday.

The charter was then given to Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha. It was subsequently stamped by a royal seal and put on a gold tray on a pedestal before the assembly of royal family members, privy councillors, cabinet ministers, ambassadors, as well as members of the National Legislative Assembly and the Constitutional Drafting Committee, presidents of the Supreme Court and independent organisations and high-ranking officials.

A scribe then read the royal statement promulgating the 2017 constitution.

Officials beat gongs and blew trumpets and a royal guards band played marching music, followed by a 21-gun salute by the army, navy and air force.

Temples throughout the country simultaneously recited prayers, rang bells and beat drums.

Wednesday's story

This famous bell at Wat Phra Kaew will likely be heard late tomorrow afternoon together with bells across the country as His Majesty the King promulgates the new constitution. THANARAK KHUNTON

Temples to ring bells, beat drums on April 6

Online reporters

You can use your computer or smartphone to quickly hear how to pronounce difficult words. Like many other dictionaries, the Oxford Learners' Dictionary shown here, has both British and American pronunciations.

Monks at temples across the country have been instructed to ring bells and beat drums after His Majesty the King promulgates the new constitution at a ceremony in the Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall on Thursday, National Office of Buddhism (NOB) director Pongporn Pramsaneh said on Tuesday.

Pol Lt Col Pongporn said the directive has been sent by urgent letter to the monastic chiefs of all provinces.

They are directed to instruct all temples to follow the schedule of the April 6 ceremony as stated in the announcement of the Royal Household Bureau.

His Majesty will preside over the charter promulgation ceremony in the Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall on April 6, Chakri Day, starting at 3pm.

After the Bureau of Royal Scribes and Royal Decorations has read out the King's announcement, officials will beat gongs and blow trumpets, which will be followed by a royal guards band playing marching music. Then will follow a 21-gun salute by the army, navy and air force.

Temples throughout the country will simultaneously recite prayers, ring bells and beat drums.

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