Majority say Thai disaster prevention measures reliable: Nida Poll

A sign outside Tham Luang in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai. (Bangkok Post photo)

A majority of people think the existing measures for disaster prevention in Thailand are reliable but safety measures should be increased at tourist attractions in nature, according to the result of a survey by the National Institute for Development Administration, or Nida Poll.

The poll was conducted on July 3-5 on 1,268 people of various levels of education and occupations throughout the country to compile their opinions on the existing disaster prevention measures in Thailand.

Asked whether they think existing Thai disaster prevention measures are reliable, 66.40% of respondents said they are highly reliable; 8.28% mostly reliable; 20.27% generally not reliable; 2.76% not reliable at all; and 2.29% were uncertain or had no comment.

Asked how urgent it is for safety measures at tourist attractions in the wild to be increased, 55.60% said it's urgent; 37.22% extremely urgent, 12.0% not particularly urgent; 0.79% said no urgency is required at all; and 0.79% were uncertain or had no comment.

On the efficiency of officials in disaster relief operations, 37.22% thought they are very efficient; 57.18% said they are generally efficient; 4.50% thought they are inefficient; 0.55% said they are totally inefficient; and 0.55% were uncertain or had no comment.

Asked to provide suggestions how to increase the effectiveness of disaster prevention measures, 52.68% suggested campaigns to teach people how to survive in challenging conditions; 51.42% wanted to see more safety officers at tourist sites; 49.84% said more warning signs should be put up; 23.90% said teams should be sent out to more accurately survey scenic spots; 23.42% said there should be a trail map at every tourist site; 12.46% said ages of tourists visiting scenic tourist spots should be restricted; and 2.21% said there should be clear rules and regulations and a disaster warning system at all tourist spots.

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