More Boeings grounded amid global probe into crash

In this photo dated Nov 12 last year, the actual Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 plane that crashed on Sunday, shortly after take-off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, shown as it lands at Seattle Boeing Field King County International airport in the US. (AP photo)

HEJERE, Ethiopia: A growing number of airlines grounded a new Boeing plane involved in the Ethiopian Airlines disaster as a global team of investigators began picking through the rural crash site on Tuesday.

Some airlines cited worried customers for grounding the Boeing 737 Max 8, as experts chased details on why the plane crashed shortly after takeoff Sunday, killing all 157 on board. Answers could take months.

Malaysia on Tuesday banned Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft from its airspace, the aviation regulator said, becoming the latest country to do so following a deadly plane crash in Ethiopia.

"The Civil Aviation Authority of Malaysia with immediate effect is suspending the operations of the Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft flying to or from Malaysia and transiting in Malaysia until further notice," said a statement from the regulator's chief executive Ahmad Nizar Zolfakar.

The statement noted there had been "two fatal aircraft accidents involving the Boeing 737 MAX 8 in less than five months".

No Malaysian carriers currently operate the model, the aviation authority said. It did not say which airlines regularly operate the planes in the country's airspace.

However, flag carrier Malaysia Airlines has ordered a number of 737 MAX aircraft, and the government on Monday ordered an urgent review into the planned purchase.

Oman and South Korean airline Eastar Jet halted use of the plane. Australia and Singapore suspended all flights into or out of their countries.

Boeing, however, has said it has no reason to pull the popular aircraft from the skies, and it does not intend to issue new recommendations about the aircraft to customers. Its technical team joined American, Israeli and other aviation experts in the investigation led by Ethiopian authorities.

The US Federal Aviation Administration said it expects Boeing will soon complete improvements to an automated anti-stall system suspected of contributing to the deadly crash of another new Boeing 737 Max 8 in October, and update training requirements and related flight crew manuals.

Safety experts have cautioned against drawing too many comparisons too soon with that Lion Air crash of the same model that killed 189 people in Indonesia.

The Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed in clear weather six minutes after taking off for Nairobi.

One witness told The Associated Press that he saw smoke coming from the plane's rear before it crashed in a rural field. "The plane rotated two times in the air, and it had some smoke coming from the back then, it hit the ground and exploded,'' farmer Tamrat Abera said.

It should take five days before any victims' remains are identified, Ethiopian Airlines spokesman Asrat Begashaw told the AP. The dead came from 35 countries and included dozens of humanitarian workers.

A pilot who saw the crash site minutes after the disaster told the AP the plane appeared to have "slid directly into the ground''.

Investigators on Monday found the jetliner's two flight recorders at the crash site. An airline official, however, told the AP one recorder was partially damaged.

"The engine is here, the wreckage, the humans, the flesh and remains, still we are collecting,'' one investigator at the site, Amdey Fanta, said Tuesday.

Ethiopian Airlines, widely seen as Africa's best-managed airline, grounded its remaining four 737 Max 8s until further notice as "an extra safety precaution''. The carrier had been using five of the planes and was awaiting delivery of 25 more.

Airlines in China and Indonesia, Aeromexico, Brazil's Gol Airlines, India's Jet Airways and others also have temporarily grounded their 737 Max 8s.

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